The Ugly Truth About Packaged Foods You Need To Know

Harpreet Singh Manaktala Food Additives, Food Labels Leave a Comment

You’re Here: Part 2

If you haven’t read about Part 1. Be sure to go back and check out my 1st first post here on 3 shocking mistakes killing your health.

The Road Less Traveled

So off we go to inspect the ingredient list—the spot where the rubber hits the road. If you had listened to Eat This, Not That, you might never set foot in this direction, even though this is the most important part of the product’s package.

Ingredients: Potatoes, Vegetable Oil (Sunflower, Corn and/or Canola Oil), and Salt.

Take a moment to look at the ingredients in the Lay’s classic chips. The classic chips have only three ingredients: potatoes, vegetable oil, and salt. Granted, they are not organic potatoes, organic palm oil, or unrefined salt, which we’d prefer, but on the whole, there are no EMDs, carcinogens, toxic additives, or unpronounceable names.

The general rule of thumb, remember, is that the fewer the ingredients, the better the food, so this is a wee bit confusing, as the last we checked, three is a pretty low number where ingredients are concerned.

Now, let’s look at the healthier, smarter baked potato chips—oops, we mean crisps.

Wow! Really? We expected the Baked! Lay’s potato crisps to be baked slices of potato with less oil and a little less salt—in essence, a lower-fat (healthier and smarter) version of the classic Lay’s potato chip. Boy, did we have egg on our faces.

While Lay’s may have started with good intentions, somewhere, they took a very wrong turn. Just look at the list of ingredients that make up this “Franken Chip” lab experiment.

Dried potatoes (what—like potato flakes or granules?), cornstarch (oh, so now these are corn crisps, too?), sugar (precisely what a healthier, smarter snack should not include), corn oil (this has Genetically Modified Organism—GMO—written all over it), salt (not unrefined salt), soy lecithin (and it’s a soy chip, too—GMO alert!), and corn sugar (aka high fructose corn syrup).

We cover these Toxic Food ingredients in a lot of detail inside our member’s area. We have an entire action plan dedicated to it.

Ingredients: Dried Potatoes, Cornstarch, Sugar, Corn Oil, Salt, Soy Lecithin, and Corn Sugar.

CONTAINS A SOY INGREDIENT.

(If you haven’t checked out my new post on Fishy Things That Nobody Told You About Soy Industry, be sure to have a look)

This is no joke. This is the real ingredient list on the baked crisps. This lower-calorie, low-fat snack is not a healthier, smarter choice.

It is very definitively a Poor Food choice with ingredients that may be linked to cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, infertility, compromised immunity, accelerated aging, and numerous other health conditions and diseases.

Had you purchased this product only after a review of the Nutrition Facts, you would have opened yourself up to unwanted ingredients.

When Eat This, Not That named these potato crisps their go-to chip choice, they boasted, “Baked! Lay’s represents the classic potato chip at its absolute best.”

What? Are they serious?

These crisps are not even made with real potato slices. Far from the absolute best, the Baked!

Lay’s represents to us just how far we have strayed from natural foods and onto a dangerous new path paved with highly processed, manufactured food-like substances.

You can now see that it is only by reading the ingredient list that you can easily differentiate a Rich Food from a Poor Food, even when both the billboard and Nutrition Facts may be trying to deceive you.

And while this comparison contest hopefully enlightened you to the nature of misleading packaging, let us also point out that the winner of this battle has no cause for celebration.

Any way you slice them (literally), Lay’s potato chips are a Poor Food; they’re empty calories, with infinitesimal micronutrients and numerous health-compromising ingredients.

To locate a true Rich Food chip, check out our member’s area. We have an entire action plan dedicated to shopping grocery, which guides you to the Rich Food choices available in every aisle.

We have identified the products with ingredients that support health. On those occasions, however, when the brand we suggest is not available, or you don’t find one of your favorite foods listed in this book, you will have the tools to help you divide and conquer the packaging on your own to determine the best brand for you.

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